Nokia rocks out 3D world map, but don't forget your glasses

Nokia is going after the 3D space, promising an experience superior to that of any of its competitors, including Google and Amazon.

A website, albeit in beta, has been launched enabling consumers to see the technology first hand -though you will need a pair of 3D specs - searching for specific places around the world The site allows the user to zoom into streets as well as change the viewing angle to give a better perspective of an area.

Nokia demoed a version of its 3D mapping service earlier this year with a mock up of the fictional Gotham City from Batman, but this is the first time the Finnish manufacturer has addressed the real world.

CNN used the technology to broadcast its of the London 2012 Olympic Games. Nokia told us that one of the reasons its 3D tech appealed to the broadcaster was that it can easily be customised to suit particular needs. In the case of CNN, this was to give an insight into Olympic venues. 

However, it’s not just corporate giants who look to set to benefit from Nokia’s 3D venture:

“People recognise buildings much better in 3D,” Thom Brenner, vice-president for Nokia location & commerce, told Pocket-lint.

“Our 3D technology is playful, but it also helps people recognise places, providing scale and orientation. It’s what I call a ‘human perception of things’. This is how it looks in real life.”

Nokia says its 3D service is better than any of its competitors' because it has complete control, gathering data itself and therefore making it easier to send and innovate it. In comparison, the likes of Google and Amazon, which have both dipped their toe in the 3D world, rely on other partners.

Though Nokia’s 3D map of the world needs 3D glasses, there is a toggle that can be switched that puts the map back to 2D. Yet it leads us to wonder if a non-3D glass-wearing experience might be on the horizon?

“We have the technology,” says Brenner. “We can plug this into any technology. If someone wants to provide a screen without 3D glasses, we have everything. We can make it happen tomorrow.” 

So why haven’t we seen Nokia implement the hardware to showcase this technology, as LG did with the LG Optimus 3D?

“We’re not about display technology; we’re about the content and application part. We’re openly talking to a lot of companies out there in the industry.” 

Just as we think that’s brought that to a close, Brenner adds: "We can’t speculate about our future smart device units, but the space is open. If people think 3D is valuable, then maybe.”

You can try Nokia’s 3D map of the world by clicking here, though you will need to use Chrome or Firefox web browser.

Have you used Nokia's 3D mapping site? Let us know what you think...



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