The kit Bradley Wiggins won the Tour de France with

So, Wiggins did it, becoming the first Briton to win the Tour de France in its 109-year history. Taking victory at the Champs Elysee after a gruelling 2000-mile trip, Wiggins is the man of the hour. He didn't exactly manage it on a ten quid bike from your local market though, did he?

So, what did Bradley Wiggins use during the Tour de France? Just take a look at the kit list.

Pinarello Dogma 2

Except for the final day of the tour, where Wiggins rode a very special custom-painted Pinarello 65.1, the great Brit spent the entire trip on a Pinarello Dogma 2. Pricing for this ride can vary a lot, but we estimate Wiggin's entire setup to have cost around £10,000. Factor in that a lot of mechanics purchase multiples of each part to find the absolute lightest and you get an idea of the amount we're talking about.

The Dogma 2 is an entirely hand-built carbon-fibre frame featuring clever little tweaks such as kinked chain stays and an unusual seat post. In terms of hardware used with the frame, Wiggins like to do things very differently. He uses something called an o.symetric chain ring which is totally unlike anything else you will have seen on other bikes.

You see the ring where the pedals are attached, it's normally round right? Wiggins's is egg shaped. The result of this is a maximisation of pedalling efficiency when your legs are at their strongest point. Very clever indeed and something we expect more Tour riders will start using soon.

Gear-wise, the bikes Wiggins rode used the electronic Dura-Ace Shimano Di2 systems. This means all gears are shifted electronically resulting in a smooth, lightweight and easy to maintain gearing system. It also take a lot of the strain off the rider's hands, which are continually subjected to strain when changing gear over 2000 miles. 

For wheels, Wiggins used all sorts, a lot of which were custom builds and deviated from the Dura-Ace rims that other Team Sky riders used. Handlebars and stem were both Pro's Mark Cavendish signature range. For pedals he used Speedplay Zero Nanograms which are incredibly light yet tough. Quite a setup then, and we haven't moved on to the rest of Wiggin's kit yet.

Kask Vertigo helmet

With more vents than an Alien movie, the Kask Vertigo helmet is at the cutting edge of cooling. This is definitely a good thing, especially if you plan on sweating profusely for three weeks straight.

The Vertigo also features a lot of things you wouldn't normally see on a road bike helmet: quality leather straps, for example, and a comfortable gel-padded back. It is also designed very differently, wrapping comfortably round the shape of the head and not pinching at the bike like a lot of other helmets do. A little less than the bike to invest in one of these, at an affordable £169.

Bont Zero shoes

This is where Wiggins's kit gets seriously space age. Bont make very unusual cycling shoes which are famed for their incredible lightweight approach to design. The Zeros weigh around 145g per shoe and are made almost entirely from carbon fibre.

With a 4mm thin base, a reinforced sole ergonomically shaped to help with pedalling and an aluminised glass fibre top, they are more like moon boots than something you would ride a bike with.

Team Sky kit

So, you're planning on cycling for three weeks without stopping? Our first piece of advice would be to give up on the concept of ever having a bum again. Then our second would be buy the absolute best jersey, shorts and socks money can afford. 

Comfort is key here and Wiggins clearly knows it. Adopting Adidas, Team Sky's full kit fits the physique like a glove. This is important because it helps stop friction and keeps you aerodynamic at the same time. For those interested, it actually isn't hugely expensive either. Replica Team Sky kit can be picked up over at Wiggle where a jersey is £45. 

Boardman Team Carbon review

Any dream bike kit you can think of? Let us know in the comments below ...