Intel strikes deal with Motorola for future devices

Motorola and Intel have signed a multi year partnership that will see the processor company bring its mobile chip architecture to smartphones. Like the "Googorola" partnership that already exists, this should in theory further secure Motorola's position in the mobile phone market.

Intel sees the move as a means to grow its presence in the mobile processor market. The netbook did good things for Intel in terms of promoting the Atom processor, they are now however no longer popular and Intel sees the smartphone as the next logical destination for the Atom.

Unlike Intel's conventional laptop and desktop Sandy Bridge processors, the Atom is a much more low power version, usually with fewer cores. That doesn't mean it is slow however and will likely grant quite a bit of speed to something like an Android smartphone or tablet. Medfield, as Intel calls it, is a specifically designed Atom processor for phones and tablets and should be able to more than compete with the likes of Qualcomm and Samsung. 

Motorola is much more focused on the functionality benefits the partnership will bring as opposed to the speed boost that should be possible. They hope for improved battery life and advanced imaging capabilities, as well as of course a general overall performance boost.

Until we get our hands on an Intel Atom powered phone it is difficult to know exactly how they will perform. Those out in China and the US will get to play with the Lenovo K800 smartphone in the second half of 2012, which will be one of the first handsets to use the Atom architecture.

It sports a 4.5-inch TFT display that runs at 720p, uses a 1.6GHz Medfield processor and runs on Android 4.0 skinned with Lenovo's LeOS. On the back is an 8-megapixel camera which is capable of shooting 15 shots in one burst in under a second, a clear indicator of the power the Atom can bring. AT&T is due to get the K800, which will be compatible with its HSPA+ networks later in the year. 

We will have more on Motorola's Intel offerings as soon as details emerge. 

What do you think to Intel and Motorola's partnership? Let us know in the comments below ...