Facebook responds to Ceglia lawsuit, branding him an inveterate scam artist

Just over a month ago, New Yorker and convicted felon Paul Ceglia represented his lawsuit against Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, claiming that he has documentation to prove that he owns 50 per cent of the social networking site.

He had already tried to sue Zuckerberg back in July 2010, citing a signed contract that he claimed proves the Facebook owner legally gave him half of the company in return for $1,000 of investment. It covered two projects that the two worked on together; "StreetFax" and Zuckerberg's own project called "the face book."

However, Facebook lawyers dismissed the claim, stating that although the "StreetFax" part of the contract was genuine, the mention of "the face book" was fabricated.

He then, in April this year, presented "new evidence" - a series of emails that were sent to and from Zuckerberg July 2003 to July 2004, the year "the face book" started. They refer to the original investment and delays to "the face book".

However, now Facebook has responded, filing its report to the United States District Court in Buffalo, N.Y., and hasn't pulled any blows:

"“This lawsuit is a brazen and outrageous fraud on the court,” it writes. “Plaintiff is an inveterate scam artist whose misconduct extends across decades and borders. His latest and most far-reaching fraud is the amended complaint filed in this action, which is based upon a doctored contract and fabricated evidence.

"Plaintiff alleges that he recently ‘discovered’ a purported contract that now supposedly entitles him to ownership of 50 percent of Zuckerberg’s interest in Facebook. The purported contract was signed in 2003, yet plaintiff waited until 2010 to file this action - a seven-year delay during which plaintiff remained utterly silent while Facebook grew into one of the world’s best-known companies. Plaintiff has now come out of the woodwork seeking billions in damages."

Certainly, with such a strong stance, it'll be interesting to see if this case even makes it to court.

Pic: (CC) JD Lasica, socialmedia.biz.