APP OF THE DAY: You Don't Know Jack review (iPad / iPad 2 / iPhone)

You know what it's like when you rediscover a former favourite, whether it be a musical album, band, type of chocolate bar, jazz mag, whatever.

Initially, it's brilliant - the rose-tinted spectacles come out and everything's good in the hood. Eventually, though, you start to remember why it was you drifted away in the first place. It's like revisiting a relationship after a split, except you can generally fit the rediscovered object back into a drawer.

Today's App of the day, however, has made a very welcome return. And there's no pink goggles in sight...

You Don't Know Jack HD

Format
iPad, iPad 2, iPhone, iPod touch
Price
£2.99 / £1.79
Where
iTunes / iTunes

Available for iPad and iPhone, with the latter losing the "HD" suffix and therefore the healthier resolution, You Don't Know Jack HD is the app version of one of Pocket-lint's favourite quiz games of all time. The original PC version came out back in 1995 and it was one of the few causes of milkshake to come out of our noses.

It was, and now subsequently still is, the funniest adult trivia game available. Sharp, witty, stupid and difficult in equal measure, it's appeal hasn't changed in 16 years, and although the iOS version is single-player only, it'll still draw a crowd.

The aim of the game is simple, answer a series of questions over a set number of rounds and win (virtual) cash. In that, there's very little different to millions of other games on the market, such as Who Wants to be a Millionaire and its derivatives. However, the questions are not typical, nor is the voiced-over quiz master, without whom life would be oh so much more dull.

Questions can be from all manner of subjects, but generally they'll have a twist. Instead of asking how many times Elizabeth Taylor married in her life, YDKJ asks "If Elizabeth Taylor wanted to be buried next to her husbands, how many pieces would she have to be cut up into?" Sick? Perhaps. But very funny - especially if you listen to the explanation.

To be honest, that's about it. There's different types of rounds, including "Jack Attack" where you have to match two items together as they appear on screen, but they're all easy to get to grips with.

There's a couple of gripes. Firstly, as the content is heavily influenced by US pop culture, UK players may find some of the questions alien to them. And there's only 20 episodes on offer initially, with each of them repeating the exact same content on replay. However, developer Jellyvision Games promises new updates down the line, with the hint that some may feature more specialist subjects.

Multiplayer would have been welcome, but the addition of achievements and integration of Game Center adds a sort-of community feel, and with the directed voice over at least you genuinely get the feeling that you're the star of your own gameshow. All for a few quid.

Do you remember the original You Don't Know Jack? Or have you played the new console versions? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below...



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