Best Nokia phones still worth buying

Nokia's fortunes have changed greatly in the last few years. Although the Finnish phone company still ships millions of handsets, it doesn't enjoy the limelight as much as competitors such as Apple, with the iPhone, or the various manufacturers offering Android phones.

However, there's no doubt Nokia knows its stuff when it comes to handsets. Until the new stuff of Nokia World 2010 is tried and tested in our Pocket-lint reviews, we've taken a look at five Nokia phones we think are great examples of its current offerings, so if you're in the market for a new Nok, read on for more.


Nokia E72 (£269 SIM free) - The Qwerty Messenger

For want of a better way of describing it, the E72 is the BlackBerry rival in Nokia's business range. With a QWERTY keypad, integrated Mail for Exchange or IBM Lotus Notes Traveler and access to Hotmail, Gmail, Yahoo! Mail (and more) via Nokia Messaging, it's all about email.

Other business features include Nokia Mobile VPN to securely connect to a company network, a QuickOffice application to read and edit Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents on the go and a long-lasting battery for all-day connectivity.

On the more fun side of things there's a 5-megapixel camera, a media player, the Ovi store for apps, an internet browser and Ovi Maps with A-GPS while a relatively slim-line design and stainless steel accents mean it's not bad looking for a corporate-style blower.

Full Review

 

Nokia N900 (£369 SIM free) - The Mobile Computer

The N900 (a "mobile computer" according to the Nokia wording, rather than just a phone) was hyped as an iPhone competitor at launch which lead to some rather unflattering comparisons.

In many ways it outshines the iPhone, at least for anyone prepared to spend some time getting to know the Maemo operating system and setting the phone up with their personal preferences, but most consumers are more interested in having their mobiles handed to them on a plate.

If you are interested then you'll be rewarded with a rich spec list - a 3.5-inch touchscreen, up to 48GB storage, Wi-Fi, 3D graphics with support for OpenGL ES 2.0, slide-out QWERTY keyboard, a Mozilla-made browser, TV-out with cable included, 5-megapixel camera with video capture, GPS and Ovi Maps, multi-tasking abilties and Flash support.

Full Review

 

Nokia 6700 Classic (£189 SIM free) - The 'Just a Phone'


The 6700 classic is a great example of what Nokia does well. It's a nicely designed candybar handset that is as capable as it is classic.

With a stainless steel cover and keypad, the HSDPA 6700 classic offers noise cancellation tech, support for email, an Opera browser, a 5-megapixel camera, a media player, up to 8GB storage via microSD and decent battery life.

Anyone looking for a capable phone with good build quality that can do all the basics well won't go far wrong with this handset.

Full Review

 

Nokia E75 (£273 SIM free) - The All-rounder

The E75 is another business-focused phone that offers a slide-out QWERTY keyboard as well as a numeric keypad but manages to stay (just) on the right side of slim at 14.4mm thick.

It isn't quite as well-specced as other handsets in the E-Series range (there's only a 3.2-megapixel camera, Bluetooth 2.0 rather than 2.1 and only up to 16GB storage) but it's spec list shows it to be an all-rounder that can do the business stuff (email, Quick Office) as well as the fun stuff (music, gaming, browsing).

In fact, the E75 lets users "separate work and play" (as Nokia words it) with customisable business and personal homescreen modes so you can change the homescreen depending on whether it's a workday or the weekend.

Full Review

 

Nokia 3720 Classic (£109 SIM free) - The Rugged Phone

If you're somewhat clumsy, or you work in an environment that's not all executive leather chairs, carpet and comfort, a tough phone might be a good option.

Nokia's 3720 classic is worth considering as although it's dust- and water-resistent and can withstand knocks and drops, it doesn't look like a rugged phone - just an average candybar handset.

Specs aren't outstanding - it's 2.5G, there's a 2-megapixel camera, and no GPS (although you do get Nokia Maps pre-loaded) but it's durable - and a basic phone that's still working after a drop on the ground is better than a fancy one that ain't.