Best iPad apps for photographers

So you want an iPad, you're not into games and all that jazz, but you need convincing that it's going to help you make the most of your photographs either editing, showing them or even getting them.

We've scoured the 3,500 and climbing dedicated iPad apps to bring you what we think are the best iPad apps available at the moment (mid April) to help you show off your masterpieces.

We've tried, tested and reviewed all the iPad apps below ourselves rather than just guessing whether they are good or not. Now grab your camera and your iPad and get ready to look futuristic.

CameraBag

You've loaded in some photos, either via Apple's SD card or USB reader but now what do you do with them?

One suggestion is that you apply a funky filter to jazz them up a bit before saving them or sending them out to your friends.

The CameraBag app allows you to do just that with 10 filters ranging from "Instant" to "Cinema" to making it look like it was shot in 1974.

There are three main controls, although all are themselves controlled via pre-set filters; Border, Cropping, and filter.

The cropping options gives you setting like Square, 6x4 or 4x3 while the border lets you add effects to make them look like a Polaroid picture or something finer like a 1pt frame.

Once you're done you can then save them or email them out.

There is no built in printing option, but if you have a HP printer you can download the HP Print iPhone app and print your photos without having to connect it to a computer.

A good app, but limited by what you can do outside of adding filters.

Price £1.19 / $1.99

Rating 7/10


Camera-A

There was talk in the run up to the launch of the iPad that it would contain a camera for video conferencing and while that is probably going to happen with version 2 (let the rumours start now) the current iPad doesn't have one.

But wait, if you're also the owner of an iPhone you can, with the help of an app give your iPad camera like capabilities.

The system works by using the camera on the iPhone (via an app called Camera-b) that connects to the iPad allowing you to see what the iPhone camera can see.

With the two devices connected you can then remotely take a picture via the iPad and have it saved it to the iPad or the iPhone.

With no physical connect needed (ie no wires) you can use this app to place your iPhone in a hard to get to spot and then use the iPad to take the picture, well that's the idea anyway.

You can even use the app to zoom in (although its digital rather than optical of course) and play strange noises on your iPhone to scare people passing by - random.

In practice and it works as promised, we just can't see a killer use for it just yet.

Price 59p / 99 cents

Rating 7/10


Guardian Eyewitness

Everyday the Guardian uses the centrespread of its newspaper edition to show one big picture from photographers around the world.

The pictures vary from people, to animals, to nature and more, but above all they are always stunning shots.

This app lets you scan through those images with a new one available every day giving you inspiration for you own shots perhaps.

Each image comes with a caption box as well as, and this is the good bit, a pro tip telling you either how the shot was taken, like composition or camera settings. In fact it's these bits that really make it interesting and helpful to photographers rather than just the images themselves.

Photos can be shared via facebook or email and you can "star" your favourite ones for viewing at a later date.

This being an app about showing off photos, you can also turn it into a slideshow, although the app fails to let you remove the toolbar, caption or sponsorship logo from Canon.

Price Free

Rating 8/10


TiltShift Generator for iPad

Tilt shift is an effect you apply to a photograph to make everything look like you are shooting a model village regardless of the size. It's a great, if not gimmicky, trick to play with your images, but getting it right can be painstaking.

TiltShift Generator for iPad is an app that aims to help ease that pain but turning the whole process into a couple of clicks and swipes.

Load in the photo you want and then get to work editing it. You can control blur size, blur value, blur type (radial or linear), saturation, brightness, contrast, and vignetting with the ability to then save, export to email or twitter or change the resolution.

The app itself is incredibly easy to use with the options all presented as sliders to swipe and the focus point managed by simply pressing where you want it on the photo itself.

If you want to do tilt shift photography of any image regardless of where or how you took it, this is one of the easiest ways we've seen

Price £1.79 / $2.99

Rating 9/10


Frame Channel

While Apple's iPad does come with its own slideshow features to turn your iPad into a digital picture frame it's limited by only serving you images from those you've got stored on the actual device.

With a Wi-Fi connection and an amazingly glossy and crisp screen, Frame Channel lets you turn your iPad into a photo frame and stream much more than just images on your iPad.

You'll have to create an account online (you can do it via the app but we had trouble) and then once that's done load in a number of plug-ins to turn your iPad into much more when it comes to photos.

For the more boring, you can opt for a calendar mode (did you really just pay all that money to do just this) as well setting it to serve you images from a Facebook account, Flickr account and much more - there are stacks.

Photos, news, weather, sports results are all here meaning when your iPad's not in your hands it can be bringing you information or images to spruce up your living room or kitchen.

Now all you need is a stand or wall hanging case so it doesn't slide off the mantle piece.

Price Free

Rating 9/10


Photo Pad by ZAGG

Until Adobe release their photoshop for iPad app there isn't that much choice for editing images on the fly on your iPad. PhotoPad will offer you basic features like cropping, the ability to sketch on an image and fill them in with paint.

Beyond that there are filters, but most of them are for fun (negative, posterize) rather than actually letting you enhance your images although contrast, colour adjustment and greyscale might suit your needs.

Frustratingly the crop is decided by your fingers rather than offering you pre-determined sizes for photo printing later.

Images can be saved to your photo album as a separate file to be then done with as you choose.

Price Free

Rating 7/10


Photos

Without having to download a single app you do get Photos from Apple, an in-built app that lets you manage your images on your iPad.

On the device and its incredibly basic stuff. You can view your photos, pinch to zoom and scan through them very quickly with a swipe in either direction. Photos can be organised in to albums, but you can't create albums on the device, only via iPhoto.

Images can be emailed, assigned to a contact, Used as wallpaper or copied to be pasted elsewhere, however you can rotate your images, crop or edit them in any way.

On the slideshow front you can opt for how long to play each slide (2, 3, 5, 10 or 20 seconds) and whether or not the images are repeated and shuffled.

Furthermore you can opt to have music played at the same time, and one of five slideshow transitions.

Apple have also made it so that you can access the slideshow from your unlock screen, however this slideshow doesn't follow the same parameters as the slideshow within the Photos app.

Price Free

Rating 7/10


Artist's Touch for iPad

You've taken that stunning portrait and now you want to give it a bit of a Renoir look and feel? We hear you, and strangely so does the developer of ArtistTouch, a paint application that lets you turn your photos into paintings, with a bit of work from you.

What this isn't is an automated filter that simply makes your pictures look like something one of the great impressionists painted, but the ability for you to either paint a picture for scratch or trace over a photo you've already taken.

There are 11 different brush types to chose from including pencil, pastel, charcoal and airbrush and you can change the brush size and the opacity to suit your needs.

If that wasn't enough to get your excited you can then change the background material from canvas to six different effects like cracked paint or stone.

The colours are automatically taken from the photo underneath, although this can be changed to a standard colour palette and once you are done you can share your efforts on twitter, email, or simply export to photos.

Impressive, but the only problem you'll have, is matching your skills to its capabilities.

Price £2.99 / $4.99

Rating 9/10


Keynote

Why are we talking about a presentation app in a round up of photography apps? Well Keynote is fantastic for showing off your photos if you are presenting them.

Keynote for iPad, currently only available in the US store, lets you create and edit (as long as they've been created with iWork 09) presentations on the iPad and the export them back again.

Open it up and it's so easy to create a presentation, so you'll be boring perspective clients (think wedding photographers) with slideshows about what you can do and when you've shot the stuff, what you've done.

The app offers 12 templates and then a further eight page templates to get you started. You're able to import pictures from your photo album, change their size, crop them, add animations to the pages and individual elements on the page and then either show your presentation on the iPad, email it, share via iWork.com, or export so you can download it when you next connect to iTunes.

The app also supports video out (via an optional accessory) meaning you can either present on a big screen or be more intimate and get them to huddle around your new shiny toy. You had me at Keynote.

Price £TBA / $9.99

Rating 9/10


You

What apps have you found that are really good for making the most out of your iPad when it comes to pictures? Let us know in the comments below.



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